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SharePoint – Act One


Sometimes you just feel…  Well not happy.

It feels like I’ve done this a b-jillion times but back to the virtual world and crank up a new server.

First Steps…

  • Spin up a virtual system of windows 2008 r2
  • Stir in active directory and domain controller
  • Add in a heaping helping of SQL server (set up for SSRS)
    • Create a service account svc_SqlServer
  • Throw in a service account or three
  • Pour in the SharePoint binaries
    • Create service accounts for SharePoint
      • svc_SpAdmin – the installer

Shake, pour over rocks and serve… 

Ok, so it’s simply not just putting in a dvd and waiting.  Who’d thunk it.

Back to spinning up a virtual system of windows 2008 r2.

Since just happen to have one laying around (scary right), time to clone it. <—I like clones.  They’re easy to make and save oh so much time, unless you are rebuilding a whole SharePoint system.

Hmm… current state is good:

SNAGHTML258bb733

I’ll even make it a full copy…

SNAGHTML258c011e

Done and done.

Yup… latest updates..

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Lessee… this is a demo, all in one environment… so first things first is to create the dc role.

In goes active directory first…since it is greedy, by itself.

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Love those little green checks…

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Now time for DCPROMO…

Run dcpromo.exe

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Read or skip the next bit on OS Sys Compat.  I’d recommend reading it.

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Here, we are going to create a new forest.

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Type in the FQDN like foo.company.com

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As this is a virtual system, go with the 2008 R2 level.

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Add in the DNS server

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DHCP Challenge

here you’ll get some grief if you’re running on a dhcp system.  Again, this is demo mode so go with the DHCP option.

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File Locations

Defaults are fine unless your environment needs another location.  Then give it a strong p@SSw0rd!  Note: Make sure you right it down.  when you have a lot of demo systems up, using the same password for all works very well.  Saves headaches later.

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Click next and you get this…

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When it is done, click Finish and Restart.

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So far so good….

Time for SQL Server 2008 R2

Here I’ll be using the SQL Dev Version.  Time for more install fun.  Now, I could just go with a singleton install of SharePoint but that would defeat some of the issues you’ll find.  Plus, there are some cool tools and stuff.  I’ll have to do the same thing with 2012.  Also, it is not best practice to install everything on one server but hey, it’s a demo.  Typically for sites less than 10,000 users, a single web front end (SharePoint) and a separate database server (SQL) is what you need.

The StartUp Screen

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Pretty much a one stop shop for notes and documentation.  Click on installation.

The Install Screen

Go with New Installation

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Support files installed, click on OK

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Click next on the product Key,  Dev version preloads this.

Accept the License Terms and check send features, etc. to Microsoft.

Install Support Files

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Support Rules Warnings

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Here you need to note to items (the warnings).  The one about the domain controller, you can ignore.  In the real world, the DC would be managed by the IT staff and they aren’t going to let some SharePoint dude within 100ft.  So that will never be an issue.  Unless you’re the SA, then you’ll have to deal with yourself.  I was going to say “play nice” but that just didn’t sound right.

Next, the Firewall thing.  Be aware that this may impact what you are trying to do.  We’ll come back to this later.

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A cart horse thing

Next its time for features.  The cart horse thing is the PowerPivot.  SharePoint isn’t installed yet so this is not an option.

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Features?  Give ‘em to me!

On the next screen select them all then… Please Wait…

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At this stage, no rules should fail so click next.  If you have errors, resolve them and continue.

Instance or Default? Default is fine…

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Space Check

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Account Check..

Did you plan your accounts?  Well, if you are following through this blog, the current answer is no.  Do you cheat and use one and only one account?

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Some blog thoughts are found here on accounts and best practices

Microsoft’s documentation on SQL Security BP on TechNet

For the “demo system”, we’re going to cheat and use one account only.

Back to AD

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Navigate to Managed Service Accounts

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Create a new user

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Be a minimalist…

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Give it a strong password that never expires… (remember or write it down!)

never expires, cannot be changed…

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Back to SQL

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  • Use one account for all services
  • type svc_ in the object name box and click check names
  • The fully qualified name returns, click OK
  • Enter the super secret password n the all account box and click OK

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It’s magically populated:

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Windows or Mixed – More Choices…

Mixed is my preference and I add the current user.

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SSAS Account provisioning… Add Current User and accept default data directories

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SSRS : Yes, SharePoint Integrated Mode

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Tell Microsoft

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Rule Check

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Here the summary screen follows.  Click Install… Please Wait…

You’re done…with SQL

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A word from the sponsors

Now it’s time to break away from the install process for a minute.  Before installing SharePoint, it’s a good idea to create a few service accounts, logging out of your current user id and logging back in with the SharePoint install account.  You can keep it around after the install to manage the administrative side of things or get rid of it after granting those right to a specific user group.  Take a look at this web site page for more details.

Install and Farm Accounts

svc_SpAdmin

svc_SpFarm

Original Naming right?

svc_SpAdmin

This one is a bit of a heavy hitter.  We’ll start with it.  Go ahead and repeat the same process with svc_SqlServer for the two additional accounts.

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Feel free to add in descriptions…

Add svc_SpAdmin to db_owners

You start up SQL server management studio and ??? – where is it?

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All the pieces are there but no server…navigate to SQL Server Configuration Manager

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This is what you see…

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Ok, everything looks right?  What was wrong?

The first time you went in, because the server had yet to be restarted after the install, the service wasn’t running.  Going into configuration manager shows that now it is.  By starting up sql server management studio, Windows got the notice to fire up sql.

Navigate to Security

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add svc_SpAdmin

  • right click on logins, click new
  • click search and type svc

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  • click check names
  • select svc_SpAdmin

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  • click OK
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  • Click on Server Roles

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  • Grant dbcreator and securityadmin access at this time and click ok

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  • Add svc_SpAdmin to the local administrators group

It’s SharePoint Binaries Time – Finally!

Are we done with service accounts and such?  No, the fun is just beginning but enough is now in place to allow SharePoint to be brought up and installed.

A note for sanity sakes…

  • close all open applications
  • install updates and shutdown to clone

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Here a snapshot clone is sufficient.

Bring up your shiny new machine.   Heck might even activate it…

Pop in your shiny SharePoint DVD and away you go…

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Review the Prepare Stuff.  Especially take a look at Initial deployment administrative and service accounts (SharePoint Server 2010)

Install – Prereqs…

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******* Log Out and Log in as svc_SpAdmin *******

Taking the shiny new administrator out for a drive and installing binaries…

  • Click on Install SharePoint
  • enter in your msdn Product key…
  • Accept the license terms
  • Accept default file locations
  • Click on Install Now … Please Wait …

Once the prereqs are done, run the Configuration Wizard

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Restart Services

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Create a new server farm

This is demo world so letting the wizard do its thing is ok. 

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Database connection

  • enter the name of the server (computer name)
  • enter the service account
  • click next

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  • provide a passphrase (write it down)
  • Specify port and security settings

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Using Kerberos will bring up this dialog box

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NOTE: Don’t ignore this.  You will have to manually configure SPNs in AD.

Finished

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It’s SharePoint Central Admin

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And here you go…

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A couple of fun commands…even if it is simply a command line action, run it from PowerShell.   For example, you can get a list of the Kerberos tickets on the machine using klist…

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Any form of the help command works fine…

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