Creating the lab 2


What’s gone on before…

In creating the lab 1, I hopefully set up an isolated domain controller.  This I’ve started up so it will be ready to be connected to once the other systems are brought online.  The next server to bring into the mix is the SQL server.    First, I took a look in TechNet for the recommended set and found this:Server Configuration – Service Accounts.  Hey sometimes going to the source does pay off.

The services that need accounts set up for are:

Service What it does Comments Account Name Used
SQL Server Agent Runs jobs, handles monitoring and administrative tasks You’ll be using this and you may want to toggle from Manual to Automatic start depending on your needs. svcSQLAgnt
SQL Server Runs the database engine Startup type is Auto. svcSQL
SQL Server Browser Exposes the server so it can be “discovered” by other servers. In the lab, turn this on.  It may already be set to automatic if there are conditions that require it to be there.  In a production environment, this is an option you may leave disabled. Change from NT Authority \ Local Service to svcSQLbrwsr
Analysis Services Needed for SharePoint integration (power pivot) and runs the Analysis Services parts This is will be a domain account specifically because it needs to integrate with SharePoint svcSQLSSAS
*trust me, SSAS is the best acronym for Analysis…
Reporting Services Facilitates the report engine for SQL Server, also used by SharePoint This account will need a Service Principal Name set up (SPN) See: Configure WIndows Authentication in Reporting Services svcSQLSSRS
*keeping with the same format as SSAS.
Integration Services SQLs ETL engine.  Moves data around from various data sources into a target location Set this up as well.  You might not need it initially but for the lab it will be useful. svcSQLSSIS
SQL Server Full-text filter Daemon Launcher Needed for full text indexing. As with all of the other accounts, the best model is the principal of least privilege and making it a domain account helps to solve this.  The account needs to run the FDHOST.exe Launcher service. svcSQLFullTxt

Be sure to take a look at the Microsoft page too.  It has useful links that this will not cover.

Here are the virtual settings for the SQL Server box:

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Is this optimum?  No.  Pretty much squeaking by here.  I know the whole network will be a bit slow but that is ok.  I can come back and adjust later if more memory is needed or I get more memory for my system.

I’ll start the system using NAT for the network connection to make sure it is up to date, then I’ll switch it over to the new network.

Starting with a blank Windows 2008 R2 box, I made sure it was current on updates.  Once this goes into it’s private network, there will be no direct updates.  The option exists to download them elsewhere but that’s a bit labor intensive.  The other option is to reset back to DHCP, change the connection to NAT and run updates that way.  That works pretty good for everything except the domain controller.  Granted, if your IT department frowns on rogue servers, probably it’s best to keep it isolated.

While waiting for the server to finish, there’s plenty of time to create the service accounts.  A quick switch back to the domain controller…

Once there, bring up AD

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Depending on your login, you may need to run Active Directory Users and Computes in a different context.  Using Shift+Right Click brings up the option to “run as different user”.  Already logged in as Admin so no issues right now.

First, looking at Users, there’s nothing really special yet.

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Next, check Managed Service Accounts

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This is where we’ll add in the new accounts.

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Give it a meaningful password like p@ssw0rd! and make it non-expiring.

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Next, copy the entry and add the rest.

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You end up with something like:

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Right now these are simple accounts with no special permissions.  A quick check back to our target sql server and it has finished it’s windows update.   As I wait for it to finish, I’m struck by the question, I have an isolated network to join.  Once joined, the server will not have access to windows update.  I’m installing a base level of SQL Server.  How can I make sure it is up to date?  Fortunately, Microsoft makes the patches readily available at:Download Center specific to SQL.  Back to the server that is going to host SQL.  It’s done.  Now to join the domain…

First, the server has to be powered down and the network connection changed.

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Now it’s set to look at the host only network.  Fire it up and try to ping the domain controller…

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About what I expected.  Still some more work to do here.  Into to the network adapter properties, changed the IP address to a static IP and pointed it to the DNS server.

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Back to the command window and ran:  ipconfig /flushdns, then ipconfig /all

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Tried PING again…

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That’s better.  Now to add it to the domain:

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Oops…This time without the typo…

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Login as the SQL Account

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Do a happy dance:

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And restart the server.

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Logon…insert the SQL disk into the dvd player.

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Fresh logon screen with the update files copied over.

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Install the developer edition.  Since our svcSQL account has no permissions, you have to sign on as adminstrator.

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Next challenge box is requesting the .net framework.  Click OK and the installation center shows up after a short wait.

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Any link that needs internet access will not work in this isolated environment.  The System Configuration Checker does.  Running it hopefully returns lots of green Checks…hmmm there’s a warning…

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A quick check shows that the warning is due to lack of internet access.  Not a problem.  Moving on.  I’ve always found this a little confusing, you have the main links down the page but to get the install going, you need to click on the word “Installation”.  Not intuitive…

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Thankfully, this does present a whole new set of options like “New installation…”.  Yup, that’s the one…  Not putting in a failover cluster, not adding a node and not upgrading…

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A good message…since this is developer…get to power right by the product key with a NEXT.

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Normally, I’d make sure both boxes are checked but without Internet Connection, it’s somewhat pointless… NEXT.

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Here’s one of those items where, I have to ask, “Do I really care?”  Setup support files…probably removed post setup.  Help with the setup.  Couldn’t this just be a background operation?  Oh, I hear the echo of “just use PowerShell dummy…”  PowerShell does all…  Really it does but that’s way beyond this blog…go to Scripting Guys place for help or

get-command *sql*

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Back to installing SQL…Setup Setup is done, now a new report, 2 warnings this time:

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.Net is back.  No surprise but what about the Firewall?  This just “MAY” be important for SharePoint…the message you get is:

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I’ll come back around to this later.  There will need to be some changes like to port 1433…

Onward with SQL…first open up port 1433 with netsh…

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Now for the chicken egg question:

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PowerPivot will be wanted but there is no SharePoint server yet.  The result? Going along with the default install.  On the next screen, selected it all…along with the default options.

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Again with the success.

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This is a demo setup, so going with the defaults…

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Space Check gets the Green Check…

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Screeching halt – what went wrong?:

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Nothing but it’s time to dig out those handy accounts…

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Let’s see if the AD is searchable and has our accounts:

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So far so good…I set what I could.  I checked the Collation and left it set to the default of SQL_LATIN1_General_CP1_C_AS.

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For account provisioning, mixed mode, add in the Admins as well:

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Leaving Data Directories alone, the next tab to check is FILESTREAM.  Having this available will be useful in dealing with BLOBs.  Thinking ahead towards SharePoint

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Provision Analysis Services Accounts.  Again accepting defaults for data directories.

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In the back of my mind, I recall that checking the Install SharePoint Integrated mode needs to be done now.  Not sure what the fallback of trying to fix it after the fact so, this seems painless, so checking away…

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Again with the operation passed:
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Then a summary:

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Here it goes with the “INSTALL”…The looming questions:

  • Does it work out of the gate?
  • Are the service accounts correctly provisioned?

Again with the Success…this is good…now test.

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First Fire up SQL Server Management Studio:

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From the services window:

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There are all the services including the db engine. So what’s up with SQL Management Studio?

Explore the newly installed server.  Here’s an interesting tidbit.  When you fire up management studio for the first time, no databases are available.  Didn’t you just install one?  Try entering in (local)

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Ah… the svcSQL account does not have access:

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Close Management Studio and Shift+Right Click and run as different user.  Log in as Administrator…

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Yup, that was it.  This is a good place to stop…

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